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What are tips to cut down the amount of salt in my diet?

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To eat less salt, try these tips:

  • Read labels. Look for "salt," "sodium," "sea salt," and "kosher salt."
  • Rinse salty canned food such as tuna before using it.
  • Substitute herbs and spices for sodium and salt when cooking.
  • Avoid instant or flavored side dishes, which usually have a lot of added sodium. Instead, try cooking plain rice, pasta, or grains without adding salt. You can add other flavorings or a bit of salt when you serve them.
  • Look for "low sodium" on food labels.

From: Heart-Healthy Diet and Exercise WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: American Medical Association: "Preventing Heart Disease: Making Lifestyle Changes."  National Institutes of Health: "The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure." National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: "Aim for a Healthy Weight: Key Recommendations;" "Your Guide to Living Well with Heart Disease;" and "Your Guide to Lowering High Blood Pressure."


Reviewed by James Beckerman on November 08, 2017

SOURCES: American Medical Association: "Preventing Heart Disease: Making Lifestyle Changes."  National Institutes of Health: "The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure." National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: "Aim for a Healthy Weight: Key Recommendations;" "Your Guide to Living Well with Heart Disease;" and "Your Guide to Lowering High Blood Pressure."


Reviewed by James Beckerman on November 08, 2017

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