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Why does high blood pressure affect African-Americans differently?

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There's not a definitive answer to this question, but some researchers believe that high blood pressure in African-Americans may be triggered by the genetic make-up of people of African descent. In the U.S, blacks respond differently to high blood pressure drugs than do other groups of people. This group also seems to be more sensitive to salt, which increases the risk of developing high blood pressure.

Some scientists believe that social and economic factors in the U.S. -- including discrimination and economic inequality -- are responsible for the difference.

SOURCES: American Academy of Family Physicians: "High Blood Pressure: Things You Can Do to Help Lower Yours." Mayo Clinic: "How being black affects your blood pressure." National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute: "Your Guide to Lowering High Blood Pressure."  WebMD Medical Reference: "High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)," and "How adrenaline regulates blood pressure." American Medical Association.




Reviewed by James Beckerman on October 10, 2017

SOURCES: American Academy of Family Physicians: "High Blood Pressure: Things You Can Do to Help Lower Yours." Mayo Clinic: "How being black affects your blood pressure." National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute: "Your Guide to Lowering High Blood Pressure."  WebMD Medical Reference: "High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)," and "How adrenaline regulates blood pressure." American Medical Association.




Reviewed by James Beckerman on October 10, 2017

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What increases the chance of high blood pressure for African-Americans?

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