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Can you get a transplant for short bowel syndrome?

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Your doctor may suggest surgery, including a transplant of part or all of your small intestine. A new organ can cure small bowel syndrome, but a transplant is major surgery.Doctors usually recommend it only when other treatments haven’t worked.

If you choose this option, your doctor will put you on a waiting list for a small intestine from a donor. After your transplant, you could be in the hospital for 6 weeks or longer. You'll need to take drugs that prevent your body from rejecting your new organ. You’ll need the medicine and regular check-ups for the rest of your life.

From: Short Bowel Syndrome WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: "Short Bowel Syndrome Overview."

Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America: "Short Bowel Syndrome and Crohn's Disease."

International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: "Short Bowel Syndrome," "Treatments of Short Bowel Syndrome."

Medscape: "Short-Bowel Syndrome."

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse: "Short Bowel Syndrome."

Short Bowel Syndrome Foundation: "About Short Bowel Syndrome."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on March 18, 2019

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: "Short Bowel Syndrome Overview."

Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America: "Short Bowel Syndrome and Crohn's Disease."

International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: "Short Bowel Syndrome," "Treatments of Short Bowel Syndrome."

Medscape: "Short-Bowel Syndrome."

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse: "Short Bowel Syndrome."

Short Bowel Syndrome Foundation: "About Short Bowel Syndrome."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on March 18, 2019

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