PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

Does Crohn's disease affect conception?

ANSWER

If you have active Crohn's disease you may have a more difficult time getting pregnant than you would when it's in remission. Ideally, you should be in good health and in remission when you conceive.

If a man who wants to become a father is taking sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) for Crohn's disease, he should ask his doctor to change his medication. Sulfasalazine can cause a lower sperm count.

The drug methotrexate is deadly to fetuses and newborn babies. If a man is taking methotrexate for Crohn's disease, he should stop taking it for three months before attempting conception. Women with Crohn's disease should avoid methotrexate before getting pregnant and while pregnant. If you are taking methotrexate after giving birth, you should not breastfeed.

If both parents have irritable bowel disease (IBD), the child has about a one in three chance of having IBD. If only one parent has Crohn's disease, the chance of the baby getting the condition is about 9%.

Crohn's disease seems to affect children more severely than adults. A child with Crohn's disease may have slower growth and delayed sexual development.

From: Crohn's Disease and Pregnancy WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on September 17, 2019

Medically Reviewed on 9/17/2019

SOURCES:

Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America: "IBD and Pregnancy: What You Need to Know."

FDA. “FDA approves Amjevita, a biosimilar to Humira.”

National Digestive Disease Information Clearinghouse: "Crohn's Disease."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on September 17, 2019

SOURCES:

Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America: "IBD and Pregnancy: What You Need to Know."

FDA. “FDA approves Amjevita, a biosimilar to Humira.”

National Digestive Disease Information Clearinghouse: "Crohn's Disease."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on September 17, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

How does Crohn's disease affect your pregnancy?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.