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If I have Crohn's disease, should I talk to my doctor before taking vitamin supplements?

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While supplements may be a good idea for you, don't decide by yourself. Talk to your doctor first. Some can affect the way your Crohn's disease drugs work -- or make your symptoms worse.

He may want to test your levels of iron, vitamin D, vitamin B12, and other vitamins and minerals. What you need may also depend on where the damage is in your small intestine.

Together, you can decide which supplements may help you feel your best.

From: Vitamins for Crohn's Disease WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

ASPEN Nutrition Support Patient Education Manual: "Nutrition and Crohn's Disease."

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center: "What Are the Complications of Crohn's Disease?"

Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America: "Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)," "Diet and Nutrition."

Medscape: "Vitamin D Intake Associated with Reduced Risk of Crohn's Disease."

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse: "Ulcerative Colitis."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on October 10, 2018

SOURCES:

ASPEN Nutrition Support Patient Education Manual: "Nutrition and Crohn's Disease."

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center: "What Are the Complications of Crohn's Disease?"

Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America: "Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)," "Diet and Nutrition."

Medscape: "Vitamin D Intake Associated with Reduced Risk of Crohn's Disease."

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse: "Ulcerative Colitis."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on October 10, 2018

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