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What are some other reasons to use surgery to treat Crohn's disease?

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A person with Crohn's disease who has developed a fistula or an abscess may need surgery. Fistulas, the abnormal passageways, may first be treated with medication, but if drugs do not help the fistulas to close, then the patient will need a bowel resection (removal of the problem area) and anastomosis (reconnection of the normal bowel).

In order to heal an abscess, the pocket of infection usually must be drained. The patient will have a computerized tomography (CT) scan to let the doctor locate the abscess. In some cases, the pus can be fully drained with a tube place through the skin. In many cases, however, surgery is needed to treat the abscess.

From: Surgery for Crohn’s Disease WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse: "Crohn's Disease."

Crohn's & Colitis Foundation: "Surgery for Crohn's Disease."

Reviewed by Jaydeep Bhat on February 14, 2019

SOURCES:

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse: "Crohn's Disease."

Crohn's & Colitis Foundation: "Surgery for Crohn's Disease."

Reviewed by Jaydeep Bhat on February 14, 2019

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