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What happens during a colonoscopy or a sigmoidoscopy for Crohn's disease?

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During these procedures, a flexible viewing tube is placed through the anus into the large intestine. An image of the inside of the intestine is often projected onto a video monitor. A sigmoidoscopy involves examining the lowest part of the large intestine. A colonoscopy can provide a view of all the large intestine and often the end of the small intestine, which is frequently affected by Crohn's. In either case, the doctor can directly view the colon to check for signs of ulcers, inflammation, or bleeding. The doctor can also take small samples of tissue to examine under a microscope, known as a biopsy. This helps determine whether the tissue shows signs of Crohn's disease or other problems.

From: Diagnosing Crohn's Disease WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse: "Crohn's Disease."

WebMD Medical Reference: "Diagnosing Crohn's Disease."

American College of Gastroenterology: "Inflammatory Bowel Disease."

Reuters Health: "Capsule endoscopy may miss post-op recurrence of Crohn's disease."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on June 14, 2018

SOURCES:

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse: "Crohn's Disease."

WebMD Medical Reference: "Diagnosing Crohn's Disease."

American College of Gastroenterology: "Inflammatory Bowel Disease."

Reuters Health: "Capsule endoscopy may miss post-op recurrence of Crohn's disease."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on June 14, 2018

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How does a video capsule endoscopy help with diagnosing Crohn's disease?

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