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What happens during the GI tests for the digestive tract?

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  • During GI testing: You will be positioned on a tilting X-ray table by the technologist. For an upper GI test, the table usually starts in a vertical position, with the person standing. For a lower GI test, the table usually starts in a horizontal position, with the person lying on his or her back or stomach. The table will be tilted at various angles during the test to help spread the barium solution throughout the body so that different views can be seen on the fluoroscope. During the test, the radiologist may put pressure on your abdomen to get a clearer image on the fluoroscope.
  • Although the barium solution given in an upper GI test is unpleasant tasting, there is no pain and little discomfort during the procedure. The lower GI test may cause some discomfort, including cramps and a strong urge to have a bowel movement.
  • After the barium enema is administered in a lower GI test and a few X-rays are taken, you will be helped to the bathroom (or given a bedpan) and asked to move your bowels to expel as much of the barium as possible. Then you will go back to the X-ray examination room where more X-rays will be taken of the barium solution that remains on the lining of the intestine. In some cases, air will be injected slowly into the colon to provide further contrast on the X-rays to detect abnormalities.

SOURCE: Medicinenet.

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on July 03, 2018

SOURCE: Medicinenet.

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on July 03, 2018

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What happens after the GI tests for the digestive tract?

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