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What kinds of drugs are used to treat Crohn's disease?

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There are several types of drugs used to treat Crohn's disease. The first step usually involves reducing inflammation. Many people are first treated with sulfasalazine (Azulfidine). Mesalamine (Asacol, Canasa, Pentasa) is another 5-aminosalicylic acid, or 5-ASA medication. Possible side effects of sulfasalazine and other mesalamine-containing drugs may include nausea, vomiting , diarrhea , heartburn and headache. If a person does not respond to sulfasalazine, the doctor may prescribe other types of drugs that contain 5-ASA. These other products include:

  • Olsalazine (Dipentum) Balsalazide (Colazal, Giazol)
  • Mesalamine (Asacol, Lialda, Pentasa, and others)

SOURCES:

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse: "Crohn's Disease."

Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. "Crohn’s Diagnosis & Testing." "Crohn’s Disease Medication Options."

FDA. “FDA approves Inflectra, a biosimilar to Remicade.” “FDA approves Amjevita, a biosimilar to Humira.”

Uptodate.com. "Overview of the medical management of severe or refractory Crohn disease in adults."

 

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on October 19, 2017

SOURCES:

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse: "Crohn's Disease."

Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. "Crohn’s Diagnosis & Testing." "Crohn’s Disease Medication Options."

FDA. “FDA approves Inflectra, a biosimilar to Remicade.” “FDA approves Amjevita, a biosimilar to Humira.”

Uptodate.com. "Overview of the medical management of severe or refractory Crohn disease in adults."

 

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on October 19, 2017

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