PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

How are bones affected by inflammatory bowel disease?

ANSWER

Medications (such as steroids), not enough physical activity, and trouble absorbing vitamin D and minerals such as calcium and magnesium all play a role. You’re also more likely to break a bone than the people without an IBD. This risk goes up as you age. Usually, women are more likely to get osteoporosis. But IBD-related osteoporosis affects men and women in equal numbers. Calcium and vitamin supplements can help keep your bones healthy, along with exercise, avoiding alcohol, and not smoking.

SOURCES:

Levine, J. S., , April 2011. Gastroenterology & Hepatology

Vavricka, Stephan R., Disease, August 2015. Inflammatory Bowel

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS): “What People with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Need to Know about Osteoporosis.”

TeensHealth.org: Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

WomensHealth.gov: “Inflammatory Bowel Disease Fact Sheet.”

Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America: “Liver Disease and IBD.”

Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on May 31, 2018

SOURCES:

Levine, J. S., , April 2011. Gastroenterology & Hepatology

Vavricka, Stephan R., Disease, August 2015. Inflammatory Bowel

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS): “What People with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Need to Know about Osteoporosis.”

TeensHealth.org: Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

WomensHealth.gov: “Inflammatory Bowel Disease Fact Sheet.”

Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America: “Liver Disease and IBD.”

Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on May 31, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

How else can inflammatory bowel disease affect someone?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.