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How are joints affected by inflammatory bowel disease?

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Joint pain is the most common non-gut ailment for people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It can affect your large joints like your ankles, hips, or knees, or small ones like your fingers. Although you might notice symptoms as long as a decade before you’re diagnosed, this type of arthritis usually doesn’t damage your joints. It should go away once you get your disease under control. Talk to your doctor before you take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for joint pain. They can make your IBD worse.

SOURCES:

Levine, J. S., Gastroenterology & Hepatology, April 2011.

Vavricka, Stephan R., Inflammatory Bowel Disease, August 2015.

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS): “What People with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Need to Know about Osteoporosis.”

TeensHealth.org: Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

WomensHealth.gov: “Inflammatory Bowel Disease Fact Sheet.”

Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America: “Liver Disease and IBD.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on May 28, 2020

SOURCES:

Levine, J. S., Gastroenterology & Hepatology, April 2011.

Vavricka, Stephan R., Inflammatory Bowel Disease, August 2015.

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS): “What People with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Need to Know about Osteoporosis.”

TeensHealth.org: Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

WomensHealth.gov: “Inflammatory Bowel Disease Fact Sheet.”

Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America: “Liver Disease and IBD.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on May 28, 2020

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How is skin affected by inflammatory bowel disease?

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