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How is skin affected by inflammatory bowel disease?

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You might get raised, painful lumps under your skin, usually on your lower legs. You might hear your doctor call them erythema nodosum. They’ll probably show up at the same time as your inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) flares up. They, too, will go away -- without leaving scars -- when you get a handle on the disease. Less common but more serious are ulcers that can range from a small spot to the length of your leg. There are treatments for these problems, so tell your doctor if they happen.

SOURCES:

Levine, J. S., Gastroenterology & Hepatology, April 2011.

Vavricka, Stephan R., Inflammatory Bowel Disease, August 2015.

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS): “What People with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Need to Know about Osteoporosis.”

TeensHealth.org: Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

WomensHealth.gov: “Inflammatory Bowel Disease Fact Sheet.”

Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America: “Liver Disease and IBD.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on May 28, 2020

SOURCES:

Levine, J. S., Gastroenterology & Hepatology, April 2011.

Vavricka, Stephan R., Inflammatory Bowel Disease, August 2015.

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS): “What People with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Need to Know about Osteoporosis.”

TeensHealth.org: Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

WomensHealth.gov: “Inflammatory Bowel Disease Fact Sheet.”

Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America: “Liver Disease and IBD.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on May 28, 2020

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How are eyes affected by inflammatory bowel disease?

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