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What is a low-residue diet?

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Your doctor might suggest this if you have an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) like Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Residue is undigested food, including fiber, that makes up stool. The idea is to eat foods that are easy to digest and cut back on those that aren't. You'll cut back on high-fiber foods, like whole-grain breads and cereals, nuts, seeds, raw or dried fruits, and vegetables. That will ease symptoms like diarrhea, bloating, gas, and stomach cramping. The goal is to have fewer, smaller bowel movements each day.

From: Should You Try a Low-Residue Diet? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center: "Low-Residue/Low-Fiber Diet."

National Institutes of Health: "Fiber-Restricted Diet."

Greenwich Hospital: "What is a Low Fiber/Low Residue Diet."

Women and Children's Hospital of Buffalo: "Low Residue Diet."

"Colitis Cookbook: Diet for Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease."

Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America: "Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis: Diet and Nutrition."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on October 09, 2018

SOURCES:

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center: "Low-Residue/Low-Fiber Diet."

National Institutes of Health: "Fiber-Restricted Diet."

Greenwich Hospital: "What is a Low Fiber/Low Residue Diet."

Women and Children's Hospital of Buffalo: "Low Residue Diet."

"Colitis Cookbook: Diet for Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease."

Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America: "Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis: Diet and Nutrition."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on October 09, 2018

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Can I eat grains on a low-residue diet?

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