PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

How can mediations help treat inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)?

ANSWER

IBD drugs can help tamp down inflammation so your intestinal tissue can heal. That helps ease symptoms like diarrhea and stomach pain. The goal after that is to make flare-ups happen less often or keep them away. Medications depend on your type of IBD. They can include:

  • Anti-inflammatory drugs
  • Anti-diarrhea drugs
  • Antibiotics (especially for Crohn’s disease)
  • Corticosteroids, which are fast-acting anti-inflammatory meds
  • Immune-modifying drugs to spur your immune system to release anti-inflammatory chemicals
  • Biologic therapies, made from living organisms, to target proteins in the body that cause inflammation

From: Inflammatory Bowel Disease WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCE:  National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse, National Institutes of Health. FDA. “FDA approves Inflectra, a biosimilar to Remicade.” “FDA approves Amjevita, a biosimilar to Humira.” Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America."Maintenance Therapy." "What is Crohn's Disease?" "What is Ulcerative Colitis?"  



Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on September 16, 2019

SOURCE:  National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse, National Institutes of Health. FDA. “FDA approves Inflectra, a biosimilar to Remicade.” “FDA approves Amjevita, a biosimilar to Humira.” Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America."Maintenance Therapy." "What is Crohn's Disease?" "What is Ulcerative Colitis?"  



Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on September 16, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

What does medical treatment for inflammatory bowel disease involve?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.