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Which areas of the body can extra-intestinal symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease affect?

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These “extra-intestinal” symptoms, as doctors like to call them, can affect many areas of your body, including your joints, mouth, eyes, skin, liver, gallbladder, kidney, and pancreas. Even osteoporosis has been linked to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). You can have one of these extra symptoms or several. They're more common if your parents or siblings have an IBD and have extra-intestinal problems related to IBD.

SOURCES:

Levine, J. S., , April 2011. Gastroenterology & Hepatology

Vavricka, Stephan R., Disease, August 2015. Inflammatory Bowel

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS): “What People with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Need to Know about Osteoporosis.”

TeensHealth.org: Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

WomensHealth.gov: “Inflammatory Bowel Disease Fact Sheet.”

Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America: “Liver Disease and IBD.”

Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on May 31, 2018

SOURCES:

Levine, J. S., , April 2011. Gastroenterology & Hepatology

Vavricka, Stephan R., Disease, August 2015. Inflammatory Bowel

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS): “What People with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Need to Know about Osteoporosis.”

TeensHealth.org: Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

WomensHealth.gov: “Inflammatory Bowel Disease Fact Sheet.”

Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America: “Liver Disease and IBD.”

Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on May 31, 2018

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How are joints affected by inflammatory bowel disease?

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