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How can colonoscopy help diagnose ulcerative colitis?

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This test uses a flexible tube called a colonoscope to give your doctor a view of your entire colon. They can also take a tissue sample for testing. This exam can help determine the severity of ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, as well which disease you have.

During the test, a long, thin colonoscope is inserted into your rectum and moved up through your large intestine. You may get a sedative to help you relax. If you do, you will need someone to take you home after it’s done.

SOURCES:

Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America: “What is Ulcerative Colitis?” and "Diagnosing Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis."

CDC: “Diagnosis and Testing for Valley Fever (Coccidioidomycosis).”

Cleveland Clinic: “Diagnostics and Testing.”

Merck Manual Professional Version: “Ulcerative Colitis.”

Merck Manual Consumer Version: "Ulcerative Colitis."

National Health Service England: “Ulcerative colitis-Diagnosis.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on August 14, 2018

SOURCES:

Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America: “What is Ulcerative Colitis?” and "Diagnosing Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis."

CDC: “Diagnosis and Testing for Valley Fever (Coccidioidomycosis).”

Cleveland Clinic: “Diagnostics and Testing.”

Merck Manual Professional Version: “Ulcerative Colitis.”

Merck Manual Consumer Version: "Ulcerative Colitis."

National Health Service England: “Ulcerative colitis-Diagnosis.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on August 14, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

What do you need to do before having a computed tomography (CT) scan to diagnose ulcerative colitis?

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