PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What do you need to do before having a computed tomography (CT) scan to diagnose ulcerative colitis?

ANSWER

You’ll get ready for the CT scan the night before. Your doctor will give you instructions. Usually, you would need to drink only clear liquids after midnight and not eat anything for 4 hours before the test.

You may need to drink something called a contrast solution, or have it injected into a vein, right before the test. The CT scan could take between 15 minutes to an hour and your results should be ready in 24 hours.

SOURCES:

Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America: “What is Ulcerative Colitis?” and "Diagnosing Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis."

CDC: “Diagnosis and Testing for Valley Fever (Coccidioidomycosis).”

Cleveland Clinic: “Diagnostics and Testing.”

Merck Manual Professional Version: “Ulcerative Colitis.”

Merck Manual Consumer Version: "Ulcerative Colitis."

National Health Service England: “Ulcerative colitis-Diagnosis.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on August 14, 2018

SOURCES:

Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America: “What is Ulcerative Colitis?” and "Diagnosing Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis."

CDC: “Diagnosis and Testing for Valley Fever (Coccidioidomycosis).”

Cleveland Clinic: “Diagnostics and Testing.”

Merck Manual Professional Version: “Ulcerative Colitis.”

Merck Manual Consumer Version: "Ulcerative Colitis."

National Health Service England: “Ulcerative colitis-Diagnosis.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on August 14, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

What is ulcerative colitis?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.