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What is the treatment of microscopic colitis?

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Sometimes, microscopic colitis goes away on its own. If not, your doctor may suggest you take these steps:

If those don't work, your doctor may suggest medications:

If these treatments don't work, you may need medications to suppress the immune system, such as azathioprine (Imuran). Surgery for microscopic colitis is an option, but very few people ever need it.

For most people with microscopic colitis, treatment generally works well. Some people have relapses after they stop treatment.

  • Avoid food, drinks or other things that could make symptoms worse, like caffeine, dairy, and fatty foods.
  • Take fiber supplements.
  • Stop taking medication that could trigger symptoms.
  • Over-the-counter drugs to stop diarrhea, such as Imodium and Pepto-Bismol.
  • Prescription drugs to reduce swelling, such as sulfasalazine (Azulfidine), or steroids.

From: What Is Microscopic Colitis? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America: "Microscopic Colitis."

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC): "Collagenous Colitis and Lymphocytic Colitis," "Microscopic Colitis: Collagenous Colitis and Lymphocytic Colitis."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on August 22, 2017

SOURCES:

Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America: "Microscopic Colitis."

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC): "Collagenous Colitis and Lymphocytic Colitis," "Microscopic Colitis: Collagenous Colitis and Lymphocytic Colitis."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on August 22, 2017

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