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What medicines can treat ulcerative colitis (UC)?

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If you have ulcerative colitis, you’ll need to take medicine to help manage it. There are several kinds your doctor will consider, depending on what you need.

Most people with UC take prescription drugs called aminosalicylates (or “5-ASAs”) that tame inflammation in the gut. You can take them by mouth or as an enema or suppository, depend on the area of your colon that's affected. As long as you avoid your triggers, these may be enough if your disease is mild to moderate.

You may need something else, including surgery, if your condition is more severe or if those standard treatments stop working.

SOURCES:

Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America: “Aminosalicylates,” “Corticosteroids,” “Immunomodulators.”

FDA: “FDA approves Amjevita, a biosimilar to Humira.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Ulcerative Colitis.”

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on October 10, 2018

SOURCES:

Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America: “Aminosalicylates,” “Corticosteroids,” “Immunomodulators.”

FDA: “FDA approves Amjevita, a biosimilar to Humira.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Ulcerative Colitis.”

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on October 10, 2018

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How can corticosteroids help treat ulcerative colitis (UC)?

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