PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

Does knowing about your irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) triggers and symptoms help?

ANSWER

Keeping track of your symptoms is another helpful tool. In a symptom journal, record when and where you experienced any stomach pain, discomfort, bloating, diarrhea, or constipation. Include what you were doing, how you were feeling, and what type of food or medications you consumed before and when symptoms appeared. All this information may help you and your doctor determine what triggers your IBS. Then you can take reasonable steps such as dietary modification to prevent problems and take control of your life.

From: Coping With IBS WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCE: Philip Schoenfeld, MD, MSEd, MSc, co-author of American College of Gastroenterology's "Evidence-Based Position Statement on the Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome in North America." Jeanine Blackman, MD, PhD, medical director of the University of Maryland Center for Integrative Medicine. Jonathan Gilbert, who has a diplomate in herbology and acupuncture from the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM). The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Web site: "Acupuncture." Mayo Clinic Web site: "Irritable Bowel Syndrome." WebMD Feature: "Natural Alternatives for IBS." About.com: "Herbs and Supplements for IBS." University of California at Berkeley Wellness Letter. Medscape: "Probiotics Significantly Reduce Symptoms of IBS, Ulcerative Colitis," and "Highlights from Digestive Disease Week: An Expert Interview with Lawrence R. Schiller, MD."







Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on October 28, 2018

SOURCE: Philip Schoenfeld, MD, MSEd, MSc, co-author of American College of Gastroenterology's "Evidence-Based Position Statement on the Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome in North America." Jeanine Blackman, MD, PhD, medical director of the University of Maryland Center for Integrative Medicine. Jonathan Gilbert, who has a diplomate in herbology and acupuncture from the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM). The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Web site: "Acupuncture." Mayo Clinic Web site: "Irritable Bowel Syndrome." WebMD Feature: "Natural Alternatives for IBS." About.com: "Herbs and Supplements for IBS." University of California at Berkeley Wellness Letter. Medscape: "Probiotics Significantly Reduce Symptoms of IBS, Ulcerative Colitis," and "Highlights from Digestive Disease Week: An Expert Interview with Lawrence R. Schiller, MD."







Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on October 28, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

Does talking openly about irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) help?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.