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Does peppermint oil help if you have IBS?

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It can ease pain caused by inflammation. There’s no standard recommendation for how much to take or for how long, but some studies have shown that one or two capsules three times a day for 6 months can help with constipation, diarrhea, and other issues. You can take it in many forms, like capsules or a liquid. You can put it in drinks like tea. Talk to your doctor first.

From: Supplements That Can Help IBS WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: “Prebiotics and Probiotics: Creating a Healthier You.”

American Journal of Clinical Nutrition: “Probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics – approaching a definition.”

Harvard Health Publications: “Best ways to battle irritable bowel syndrome.”

IBS Network: “Probiotics and Prebiotics. Can They Help IBS?”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Irritable Bowel Syndrome.”

Mayo Clinic: “Irritable bowel syndrome.”

National Center for Biotechnology Information: “Efficacy of prebiotics, probiotics, and synbiotics in irritable bowel syndrome and chronic idiopathic constipation: systematic review and meta-analysis,” “Probiotics and prebiotics in the management of irritable bowel syndrome; a review of recent clinical trials and systemic reviews,” “Role of partially hydrolyzed guar gum in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome.”

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: “Peppermint Oil.”

Melinda Ratini, DO, family practitioner; clinical assistant professor, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Philadelphia.

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on March 04, 2018

SOURCES:

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: “Prebiotics and Probiotics: Creating a Healthier You.”

American Journal of Clinical Nutrition: “Probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics – approaching a definition.”

Harvard Health Publications: “Best ways to battle irritable bowel syndrome.”

IBS Network: “Probiotics and Prebiotics. Can They Help IBS?”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Irritable Bowel Syndrome.”

Mayo Clinic: “Irritable bowel syndrome.”

National Center for Biotechnology Information: “Efficacy of prebiotics, probiotics, and synbiotics in irritable bowel syndrome and chronic idiopathic constipation: systematic review and meta-analysis,” “Probiotics and prebiotics in the management of irritable bowel syndrome; a review of recent clinical trials and systemic reviews,” “Role of partially hydrolyzed guar gum in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome.”

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: “Peppermint Oil.”

Melinda Ratini, DO, family practitioner; clinical assistant professor, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Philadelphia.

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on March 04, 2018

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