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How does cognitive behavior therapy help people with irritable bowel syndrome?

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Cognitive behavior therapy trains people to identify and change inaccurate perceptions they may have of themselves and the world around them. It's also been used to help irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients ease symptoms and improve quality of life. Researchers gave a group of IBS patients up to 10 weekly sessions of cognitive behavior therapy in one study. The sessions covered information on IBS, muscle relaxation training, development of a flexible set of problem-solving skills related to IBS, and ways to curb worries about the illness. Results showed that 60% to 75% of participants had improvement in their symptoms.

SOURCE: Philip Schoenfeld, MD, MSEd, MSc, co-author of American College of Gastroenterology's "Evidence-Based Position Statement on the Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome in North America." Jeanine Blackman, MD, PhD, medical director of the University of Maryland Center for Integrative Medicine. Jonathan Gilbert, who has a diplomate in herbology and acupuncture from the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM). The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine: "Acupuncture." Mayo Clinic: "Irritable Bowel Syndrome." WebMD Feature: "Natural Alternatives for IBS." About.com: "Herbs and Supplements for IBS." University of California at Berkeley Wellness Letter Web site. Medscape: "Probiotics Significantly Reduce Symptoms of IBS, Ulcerative Colitis," and "Highlights from Digestive Disease Week: An Expert Interview with Lawrence R. Schiller, MD."






Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on August 30, 2019

SOURCE: Philip Schoenfeld, MD, MSEd, MSc, co-author of American College of Gastroenterology's "Evidence-Based Position Statement on the Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome in North America." Jeanine Blackman, MD, PhD, medical director of the University of Maryland Center for Integrative Medicine. Jonathan Gilbert, who has a diplomate in herbology and acupuncture from the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM). The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine: "Acupuncture." Mayo Clinic: "Irritable Bowel Syndrome." WebMD Feature: "Natural Alternatives for IBS." About.com: "Herbs and Supplements for IBS." University of California at Berkeley Wellness Letter Web site. Medscape: "Probiotics Significantly Reduce Symptoms of IBS, Ulcerative Colitis," and "Highlights from Digestive Disease Week: An Expert Interview with Lawrence R. Schiller, MD."






Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on August 30, 2019

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How does irritable bowel syndrome affect a person's ability to work?

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