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What are some things I could do to make work easier with my IBS?

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Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is especially hard on people at work.   First, give yourself enough time to get ready for work, taking into consideration time for multiple bowel movements.

It may also help to talk to a trusted co-worker about your condition. This may mean educating them about your disorder. You may also want to talk with your manager and let them know that you may need to leave a meeting early or go to the restroom often.

If a flare-up does happen, deep breathing and walking around a bit may help. You can also take measures like medicine, exercise, and therapy to minimize flare-ups.

SOURCES: Jeffrey Roberts, president and founder, Irritable Bowel Syndrome Self Help and Support Group. Lynn Jacks, founder, IBS support group in Summit, N.J. Medscape: "Diagnosis, Pathophysiology, and Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome." web site: "Irritable bowel syndrome in a community: symptom subgroups, risk factors, and health care utilization." Hulisz D. 2004; 10 (4): pp 299-309  




American Journal of EpidemiologyJ Manag Care Pharm, .

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on October 28, 2018

SOURCES: Jeffrey Roberts, president and founder, Irritable Bowel Syndrome Self Help and Support Group. Lynn Jacks, founder, IBS support group in Summit, N.J. Medscape: "Diagnosis, Pathophysiology, and Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome." web site: "Irritable bowel syndrome in a community: symptom subgroups, risk factors, and health care utilization." Hulisz D. 2004; 10 (4): pp 299-309  




American Journal of EpidemiologyJ Manag Care Pharm, .

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on October 28, 2018

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