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What antidepressants are used to treat IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D)?

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For people with IBS-D, doctors may recommend a low dose of a tricyclic anti-depressant such as amitriptyline, imipramine (Tofranil), or nortriptyline (Aventyl, Pamelor). Common side effects of these meds include dry mouth, blurred vision, and constipation. Your doctor may recommend another type of antidepressant called an SSRI, which includes citalopram (Celexa), fluoxetine (Prozac), and paroxetine (Paxil), if you have depression along with IBS. Side effects of these medicines sometimes include diarrhea, so be sure to let your doctor know if your symptoms of IBS-D get worse while you’re taking any of these medicines.

SOURCES: 

Philip Schoenfeld, MD, professor of medicine, University of Michigan.

Jeanine Blackman, MD, PhD, Bethesda, MD.

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine: "Acupuncture." 

Mayo Clinic: "Irritable bowel syndrome." 

Medscape: "Probiotics Significantly Reduce Symptoms of IBS, Ulcerative Colitis," "Highlights from Digestive Disease Week: An Expert Interview with Lawrence R. Schiller, MD."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on March 8, 2020

SOURCES: 

Philip Schoenfeld, MD, professor of medicine, University of Michigan.

Jeanine Blackman, MD, PhD, Bethesda, MD.

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine: "Acupuncture." 

Mayo Clinic: "Irritable bowel syndrome." 

Medscape: "Probiotics Significantly Reduce Symptoms of IBS, Ulcerative Colitis," "Highlights from Digestive Disease Week: An Expert Interview with Lawrence R. Schiller, MD."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on March 8, 2020

NEXT QUESTION:

Should I talk to my doctor before I try acupuncture or herbs for my irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)?

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