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What are the long term risks associated with celiac disease?

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Over time, celiac disease can damage the lining of your intestines, and your body may not be able to take in enough nutrients. You also may become lactose-intolerant and get painful gas from dairy products. If you don't get enough calcium and vitamin D from food, your bones can become weak or soft. 

Kids with celiac disease may not get enough food or nutrients to develop strong muscles or bones. They can lag behind other children in height and weight.

About 20% of people with celiac disease who cut out gluten still have symptoms. Some of those people may also have irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS.

From: Is It Celiac or IBS? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Canadian Society of Intestinal Research: "Celiac disease hidden among IBS patients?"

Sainsbury A. . Published online Dec. 2012. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology

Cash B. . Published online July 2011. Gastroenterology

Mayo Clinic: "Celiac disease."

International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: "About IBS."

SutterHealth.org.

Celiac Disease Foundation.

Rubio-Tapia A. . Published online July 2012. American Journal of Gastroenterology

Biesiekierski J. . Published online January 2011. American Journal of Gastroenterology

National Institutes of Health: "What is celiac disease?"

Reviewed by Jaydeep Bhat on April 22, 2019

SOURCES:

Canadian Society of Intestinal Research: "Celiac disease hidden among IBS patients?"

Sainsbury A. . Published online Dec. 2012. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology

Cash B. . Published online July 2011. Gastroenterology

Mayo Clinic: "Celiac disease."

International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: "About IBS."

SutterHealth.org.

Celiac Disease Foundation.

Rubio-Tapia A. . Published online July 2012. American Journal of Gastroenterology

Biesiekierski J. . Published online January 2011. American Journal of Gastroenterology

National Institutes of Health: "What is celiac disease?"

Reviewed by Jaydeep Bhat on April 22, 2019

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How common is irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)?

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