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What medications treat irritable bowel syndrome?

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Antispasmodics can control colon muscle spasms, but experts are unsure that these drugs help. They also have side effects, including drowsiness and constipation, that make them a bad choice for some people.  Antidiarrheal drugs, such as Imodium, may help with diarrhea. Laxatives can give short-term relief from constipation. Bulking agents, such as psyllium, wheat bran, and corn fiber, help slow the movement of food through the digestive system and may help relieve symptoms.

Antidepressants may also help ease symptoms in some people.  Linaclotide (Linzess) helps to relieve constipation by helping bowel movements happen more often. It’s not for minors. Lubiprostone (Amitiza) can treat IBS with constipation in women when other treatments have not helped. Studies haven’t fully shown that it works well in men. Talk with your doctor about which medicines are right for you.  

From: Irritable Bowel Syndrome WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse. Irritable Bowel Syndrome Association. FDA.


Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on March 25, 2018

SOURCES: National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse. Irritable Bowel Syndrome Association. FDA.


Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on March 25, 2018

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