PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What prescription medication is available for IBS-D?

ANSWER

There are several options your doctor can prescribe.

Anticholinergic dicyclomine (Bentyl) slows bowel contractions that lead to diarrhea. Hyoscyamine (Levsin) acts in much the same way.

An antidepressant may be an option if your irritable bowel syndrome with excessive diarrhea (IBS-D) causes a lot of pain or if you’re feeling depression or anxiety. Low doses of antidepressants may block pain signals to the brain.

Anti-anxiety drugs may work if you feel anxious right before your symptoms come on. Your doctor may suggest medicines like clonazepam (Klonopin), diazepam (Valium), and lorazepam (Ativan) to calm you down. They’re usually only given for a short time since they have a higher risk of addiction.

Alosetron hydrochloride (Lotronex) is specifically for women with IBS who are not having success with other treatments. It can help relieve stomach pain and diarrhea, but there are potentially serious side effects.

Eluxadoline (Viberzi) may help reduce bowel contractions, belly cramps, and diarrhea. It’s also important to note that this is classified as a Schedule IV controlled substance. This means, among other things, that you’ll have to have a new prescription from your doctor each time you need it.

Rifaximin (Xifaxan) is an antibiotic that can decrease bacterial overgrowth and diarrhea. You take it for 2 weeks at a time. The treatment can be repeated up to two times if the symptoms come back.

From: What Is IBS-D? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Canavan, C. , 2014. Clinical Epidemiology

Cleveland Clinic: "IBS."

Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America: "Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Similarities and Differences."

FDA: "FDA Approves Two New Therapies to Treat IBS-D."

International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: "IBS With Diarrhea," "What Is the Relationship of Stress to IBS?"

Office on Women's Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: "Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Fact Sheet."

Arun Swaminath, MD, gastroenterologist, Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on February 25, 2018

SOURCES:

Canavan, C. , 2014. Clinical Epidemiology

Cleveland Clinic: "IBS."

Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America: "Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Similarities and Differences."

FDA: "FDA Approves Two New Therapies to Treat IBS-D."

International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: "IBS With Diarrhea," "What Is the Relationship of Stress to IBS?"

Office on Women's Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: "Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Fact Sheet."

Arun Swaminath, MD, gastroenterologist, Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on February 25, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

What are ways to calm down my symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.