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When should someone with irritable bowel syndrome call the doctor?

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Your doctor has told you that you have irritable bowel syndrome and you’re learning how to live with it. You think you’ve got it under control when along comes a new symptom, or the ones you already have just won’t go away. Should you make a doctor’s appointment or wait it out?

If you’re not sure, it’s always best to get it checked. Whenever you have a symptom of irritable bowel syndrome that lasts a long time, or if you get a new symptom, see your doctor.

If you usually take over-the-counter medications but now they don’t ease problems like diarrhea, gas, or cramping, you also need to see a doctor.

SOURCES:

The IBS Network: “When Should I See My Doctor?”

Colitis & Crohn’s Foundation of America: “IBS and IBD: Two Very Different Disorders.”

FamilyDoctor.org: “Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS).”

American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons: “Irritable Bowel Syndrome Expanded Version.”

International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: “Changes You Should Not Ignore If You Have IBS.”

Reviewed by William Blahd on August 18, 2016

SOURCES:

The IBS Network: “When Should I See My Doctor?”

Colitis & Crohn’s Foundation of America: “IBS and IBD: Two Very Different Disorders.”

FamilyDoctor.org: “Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS).”

American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons: “Irritable Bowel Syndrome Expanded Version.”

International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: “Changes You Should Not Ignore If You Have IBS.”

Reviewed by William Blahd on August 18, 2016

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What are the most common symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome?

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