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How is luteal phase defect treated?

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What you do for this condition depends on your overall health and whether or not you're trying to get pregnant. You'll need treatment, of course, if you have any health problems that can lead to luteal phase defect. If you don't want to get pregnant, you may not need any treatment. But if you're trying to have a baby, your doctor may suggest medicines such as:

Talk to your doctor about all your treatment options. Studies have not proved that treating luteal phase defect improves the chances of a successful pregnancy in women who don't use assisted reproduction techniques.

Progesterone can help some women who get fertility treatments. But there's no proof that taking it after you get pregnant will prevent a miscarriage.

  • Clomiphene citrate (Clomid). It triggers your ovaries to make more follicles, which release eggs.
  • Human chorionic gonadotropin. It may help start ovulation and make more progesterone.
  • Progesterone injections, pills, or suppositories. They may be used after ovulation to help the lining of your uterus grow.

From: Luteal Phase Defect WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Resolve: The National Infertility Association: "About Luteal Phase Defects," "Luteal Phase Defect."

Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease , 8th edition, Saunders Elsevier, 2009.

Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies , 6th edition, Saunders Elsevier, 2012.

Coutifaris, C.   Nov. 1, 2004. Fertility and Sterility.

Ginsburg, K.A.  , 1992. Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America

Fertility and Sterility,  November 2012.

E-tegrity: "E-tegrity Test."

Glock, J.L.  , September 1995. Fertility and Sterility

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Hyperprolactinemia."

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on February 14, 2019

SOURCES:

Resolve: The National Infertility Association: "About Luteal Phase Defects," "Luteal Phase Defect."

Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease , 8th edition, Saunders Elsevier, 2009.

Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies , 6th edition, Saunders Elsevier, 2012.

Coutifaris, C.   Nov. 1, 2004. Fertility and Sterility.

Ginsburg, K.A.  , 1992. Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America

Fertility and Sterility,  November 2012.

E-tegrity: "E-tegrity Test."

Glock, J.L.  , September 1995. Fertility and Sterility

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Hyperprolactinemia."

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on February 14, 2019

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