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What is luteal phase defect?

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The luteal phase is the stage of your menstrual cycle that comes after ovulation (when your ovaries release an egg) and before your period starts. During this time, the lining of your uterus gets thicker to prepare for a possible pregnancy. If you have a luteal phase defect, that lining doesn't grow properly. This can make it hard to get or stay pregnant. A luteal phase defect can happen if your ovaries don't release enough progesterone, or the lining of your uterus doesn't respond to the hormone.

SOURCES:

Resolve: The National Infertility Association: "About Luteal Phase Defects," "Luteal Phase Defect."

Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease, 8th edition, Saunders Elsevier, 2009.

Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies, 6th edition, Saunders Elsevier, 2012.

Coutifaris, C. Fertility and Sterility. Nov. 1, 2004.

Ginsburg, K.A. Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America, 1992.

Fertility and Sterility, November 2012.

E-tegrity: "E-tegrity Test."

Glock, J.L. Fertility and Sterility, September 1995.

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Hyperprolactinemia."

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on February 14, 2019

SOURCES:

Resolve: The National Infertility Association: "About Luteal Phase Defects," "Luteal Phase Defect."

Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease, 8th edition, Saunders Elsevier, 2009.

Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies, 6th edition, Saunders Elsevier, 2012.

Coutifaris, C. Fertility and Sterility. Nov. 1, 2004.

Ginsburg, K.A. Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America, 1992.

Fertility and Sterility, November 2012.

E-tegrity: "E-tegrity Test."

Glock, J.L. Fertility and Sterility, September 1995.

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Hyperprolactinemia."

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on February 14, 2019

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What causes luteal phase defect?

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