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How can salt lead to kidney stones?

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Lots of sodium, which you get mainly through salt, means more calcium in your pee. That ups you odds for kidney stones.

From: How Can I Prevent Kidney Stones? WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on September 17, 2019

Medically Reviewed on 9/17/2019

SOURCES:

Harvard Health Publications : “5 Steps for Preventing Kidney Stones.”

Mayo Clinic: “Diseases and Conditions: Kidney Stones,” “Polycystic kidney disease.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Diet for Kidney Stone Prevention.”

University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health (uwhealth.org): “Urology: Genetic Heritability For Kidney Stones.”

American Kidney Fund: “Who is at risk for kidney stones?”

University of Utah Health Care: “Can Women Get Kidney Stones?”

Harvard Medical School: “5 steps for preventing kidney stones.”

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia:  “Kidney Stones Are on the Rise Among Youth, Especially in Females and African-Americans.”

National Kidney Foundation: “6 Easy Ways to Prevent Kidney Stones.”

National Kidney Foundation: “Phosphorus and Your CKD Diet.”

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Heath: “Directory listing of /health/Oxalate/files.”

Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : “Soda and other beverages and the risk of kidney stones.”

The Cleveland Clinic: “Kidney Stones: Oxalate-Controlled Diet.”

Urology : “Can Sexual Intercourse Be an Alternative Therapy for Distal Ureteral Stones? A Prospective, Randomized, Controlled Study.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on September 17, 2019

SOURCES:

Harvard Health Publications : “5 Steps for Preventing Kidney Stones.”

Mayo Clinic: “Diseases and Conditions: Kidney Stones,” “Polycystic kidney disease.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Diet for Kidney Stone Prevention.”

University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health (uwhealth.org): “Urology: Genetic Heritability For Kidney Stones.”

American Kidney Fund: “Who is at risk for kidney stones?”

University of Utah Health Care: “Can Women Get Kidney Stones?”

Harvard Medical School: “5 steps for preventing kidney stones.”

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia:  “Kidney Stones Are on the Rise Among Youth, Especially in Females and African-Americans.”

National Kidney Foundation: “6 Easy Ways to Prevent Kidney Stones.”

National Kidney Foundation: “Phosphorus and Your CKD Diet.”

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Heath: “Directory listing of /health/Oxalate/files.”

Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : “Soda and other beverages and the risk of kidney stones.”

The Cleveland Clinic: “Kidney Stones: Oxalate-Controlled Diet.”

Urology : “Can Sexual Intercourse Be an Alternative Therapy for Distal Ureteral Stones? A Prospective, Randomized, Controlled Study.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on September 17, 2019

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How can animal protein lead to kidney stones?

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