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What do I need to know about bladder stones?

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They’re hard little masses made up of minerals from your urine. They’re most common in men 50 and older.

Sometimes, they don’t cause any symptoms and pass out of your body on their own. You may never even know you had one. But more often, they cause pain or other problems when you pee. When that happens, you have to get them removed.

From: What Are Bladder Stones? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

RadiologyInfo.Org: “Kidney and Bladder Stones.”

National Health Service (U.K.): “Bladder Stones.”

Mayo Clinic: “Bladder Stones.”

National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease: “The Urinary Tract and How It Works.”

PubMed: “How does the prostate work?”

UpToDate: “Pelvic organ prolapse in women”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on December 21, 2018

SOURCES:

RadiologyInfo.Org: “Kidney and Bladder Stones.”

National Health Service (U.K.): “Bladder Stones.”

Mayo Clinic: “Bladder Stones.”

National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease: “The Urinary Tract and How It Works.”

PubMed: “How does the prostate work?”

UpToDate: “Pelvic organ prolapse in women”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on December 21, 2018

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