PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What happens when you get ureteroscopy to treat kidney stones?

ANSWER

When you get ureteroscopy, your doctor inserts a thin, flexible scope through your urethra, bladder and then into your ureter to reach the kidney stone. If the stone is small, she can remove it. If the stone is larger, she can use a laser passed through the scope to break it up.

SOURCES:

American Urological Association: "Kidney Stones."

Mayo Clinic: "Kidney Stones Definition," "Kidney Stones Symptoms," "Kidney Stones Treatment."

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Treatment for Kidney Stones in Adults."

National Kidney Foundation: "Kidney Stones," "Kidney Stone Treatment: Shock Wave Lithotripsy," "Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy/Nephrolithotripsy."

Saint Luke's Health System: "Treating Kidney Stones: Open Surgery."

Urology Care Foundation: "How Are Kidney Stones Treated?"

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on September 15, 2019

SOURCES:

American Urological Association: "Kidney Stones."

Mayo Clinic: "Kidney Stones Definition," "Kidney Stones Symptoms," "Kidney Stones Treatment."

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Treatment for Kidney Stones in Adults."

National Kidney Foundation: "Kidney Stones," "Kidney Stone Treatment: Shock Wave Lithotripsy," "Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy/Nephrolithotripsy."

Saint Luke's Health System: "Treating Kidney Stones: Open Surgery."

Urology Care Foundation: "How Are Kidney Stones Treated?"

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on September 15, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

What are percutaneous nephrolithotomy or percutaneous nephrolithotripsy to help treat kidney stones?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.