yoga
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Try Mind-Body Techniques

“Using mind-body techniques as part of a multidisciplinary approach to lung cancer may improve your quality of life. Mind-body practices can help address sleep disturbances, anxiety, and mood issues. Try mindfulness-based stress reduction or yoga. Both techniques use components of movement, breath control, and meditation to help you feel and live better.”

-- Monisha Bhanote, MD, integrative medicine doctor, Jacksonville Beach, FL

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ashtray
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Get Support to Quit Smoking

“If you smoke, tobacco treatment is a critical step in your treatment plan, no matter your stage of diagnosis or how long you’ve been smoking. Supportive counseling and encouragement from your oncologist and family is a tremendous advantage. By taking advantage of all opportunities to support you and your family, the path through treatment will be easier.”

-- Roy S. Herbst, MD, professor, Yale School of Medicine; NSCLC treatment and research specialist

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doctor patient consultation
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Be Informed

“Consider second opinions when deciding on your treatment plan. Look for one from an academic or community center of excellence that specializes in lung cancer and offers multidisciplinary care. Talk to your doctor about supportive care, rehab, or survivorship programs. Reach out to lung cancer organizations to stay up to date about advances in NSCLC.”

-- Danielle Hicks, chief patient officer, GO2 Foundation for Lung Cancer

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writing in notebook
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Have Your Questions Ready

“I can’t emphasize how important it is to ask questions of your medical team. Medical and technical jargon can be overwhelming. Always bring someone else with you to your doctor visits to be a second set of ears. When you go home, there will always be more questions. Write them down for your next visit and bring the list, because things go fast on visits.”

-- Gerold Bepler, MD, CEO, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit

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phone
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Use Technology to Keep Family in the Loop

“During the COVID-19 pandemic, many hospitals have limited the number of guests that can attend a visit with a patient. If you aren’t allowed to bring others with you, use your mobile device to keep your loved ones involved in your care. I encourage my patients to use a video call or speakerphone during appointments so their loved ones can hear the discussion and provide support in real time.”

-- Percy Lee, MD, professor and section chief of thoracic radiation oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

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group therapy
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Join An In-Person or Online Support Group

“In cancer support groups, people with similar experiences share knowledge and coping strategies. You can talk about your concerns and feelings and get help with practical issues. You can learn about others’ experiences with different treatments so you know what to expect and how to prepare for side effects. You may also bring family members. Ask your cancer practice providers or go online to find out more.”

-- Jussuf Kaifi, MD, thoracic surgeon, University of Missouri Health Care

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walking
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Take Care and Keep Living Your Life

“The road to treatment for any type of cancer is a long one. Depression and withdrawal are common side effects. Being able to keep your mind off your cancer is important. I always encourage patients to continue to do what they usually do. Continue your job responsibilities. Maintain a healthy lifestyle. Exercise often: Aim for 20-30 minutes per day.”

-- Mark Dylewski, MD, chief of thoracic surgery, Miami Cancer Institute

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Sources | Medically Reviewed on 12/06/2020 Reviewed by Hansa D. Bhargava, MD on December 06, 2020

IMAGES PROVIDED BY:

1) Getty

2) Getty

3) Getty

4) Getty

5) Getty

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7) Getty

 

SOURCES:

Monisha Bhanote, MD, integrative medicine doctor, Jacksonville Beach, FL.

Roy S. Herbst, MD, professor, Yale School of Medicine; NSCLC treatment and research specialist, New Haven, CT.

Danielle Hicks, chief patient officer, GO2 Foundation for Lung Cancer, Washington, D.C.

Gerold Bepler, MD, CEO, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit.

Percy Lee, MD, professor and section chief of thoracic radiation oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston.

Jussuf Kaifi, MD, thoracic surgeon, University of Missouri Health Care, Columbia, MO.

Mark Dylewski, MD, chief of thoracic surgery, Miami Cancer Institute, Miami.

Reviewed by Hansa D. Bhargava, MD on December 06, 2020

This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.