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Does diet affect lung cancer risk?

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Some studies suggest that eating healthy can lower your risk, along with giving you many other benefits for the rest of your body.

Many studies have tried to reduce the risk of lung cancer in current or former smokers by giving them high doses of vitamins or vitamin-like drugs, but none of these trials have worked out. In one study, a nutrient related to vitamin A called beta-carotene actually increased the rate of lung cancer for people who smoke. So, ask your doctor before you start any supplements.

From: Lung Cancer FAQ WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

Lungcancer.org: "Lung cancer 101." 

American Cancer Society: "Detailed Guide: Lung Cancer - Non-small Cell. What are the key statistics for lung cancer."

CDC: "Lung cancer Risk factors." 

CDC: "Lung cancer Symptoms." 

Lung Cancer Alliance News: "Lung Cancer Reducing Risk." 

Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Trial, National Cancer Institute: "Can Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Be Found Early?" 

Schabath, M.  , Sept. 28, 2005. The Journal of the American Medical Association

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on July 10, 2018

SOURCES: 

Lungcancer.org: "Lung cancer 101." 

American Cancer Society: "Detailed Guide: Lung Cancer - Non-small Cell. What are the key statistics for lung cancer."

CDC: "Lung cancer Risk factors." 

CDC: "Lung cancer Symptoms." 

Lung Cancer Alliance News: "Lung Cancer Reducing Risk." 

Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Trial, National Cancer Institute: "Can Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Be Found Early?" 

Schabath, M.  , Sept. 28, 2005. The Journal of the American Medical Association

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on July 10, 2018

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