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How is surgery used to treat Stage II lung cancer?

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If you're healthy enough, your doctor likely will recommend one of the following:

Sleeve resection: A lobe of the lung and a part of the airway are cut out.

Lobectomy: An entire lobe of the lung is removed. (The right lung is divided into three lobes; the left lung has two lobes.) Most surgeons prefer this option since it offers the best chance for cure.

Pneumonectomy: The entire lung is taken out. This might sound extreme, but you can live a normal life with only one lung.

After surgery, your doctor will check the tissue he removed for cancer cells at the edges. If so, you may need another operation to remove more cancer cells.

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: “How is non-small cell lung cancer staged?”

American Cancer Society: “Surgery for non-small cell lung cancer.”

The Society of Thoracic Surgeons: “Lung/Thoracic Surgery.”

American Cancer Society: “Treatment choices by stage for non-small cell lung cancer.”

Penn Medicine: “Photodynamic Therapy (PDT).”

American Cancer Society: “Radiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancer.”

McElnay, P. , May 6, 2014. Journal of Thoracic Disease

UpToDate: “Patient Information: Non-small cell lung cancer treatment; Stage I to III cancer (Beyond the Basics)."

American Cancer Society: “Targeted Therapies for non-small cell lung cancer.”

National Cancer Institute: “General Information About Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)," "NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms."

Annals of Thoracic Medicine: “Bronchial Stents.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on December 19, 2018

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: “How is non-small cell lung cancer staged?”

American Cancer Society: “Surgery for non-small cell lung cancer.”

The Society of Thoracic Surgeons: “Lung/Thoracic Surgery.”

American Cancer Society: “Treatment choices by stage for non-small cell lung cancer.”

Penn Medicine: “Photodynamic Therapy (PDT).”

American Cancer Society: “Radiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancer.”

McElnay, P. , May 6, 2014. Journal of Thoracic Disease

UpToDate: “Patient Information: Non-small cell lung cancer treatment; Stage I to III cancer (Beyond the Basics)."

American Cancer Society: “Targeted Therapies for non-small cell lung cancer.”

National Cancer Institute: “General Information About Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)," "NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms."

Annals of Thoracic Medicine: “Bronchial Stents.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on December 19, 2018

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