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How often will I see my doctor if I have non-small-cell lung cancer?

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The frequency of your doctor's visits depends on the stage of your cancer. Your health care team will let you know how often you should come in for checkups. Keep all your appointments so your doctors can keep up with how you feel and how well your treatment is working. They may order regular follow-up tests, like:

  • Blood work
  • Lung tests
  • Imaging tests to take pictures of the inside of your body, like CT scans or chest X-rays

SOURCES:

Roswell Park Cancer Institute: "Targeting Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Gene in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer."

My Cancer Genome: "ALK in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)."

Genetics Home Reference: "ALK."

Lung Cancer Foundation of America: "What Targeted Therapies Are Currently Available?"

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: "Genomic Testing."

UpToDate: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion oncogene positive non-small cell lung cancer.”

American Cancer Society: "Treatment choices by stage for non-small cell lung cancer."

American Cancer Society: "Targeted therapies for non-small cell lung cancer."

Bang, Y.J. October 2012. Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine,

Korpanty, G.J. , 2014. Frontiers in Oncology

UpToDate: “Patient information: Non-small cell lung cancer treatment; stage IV cancer (Beyond the Basics)."

Lab Tests Online. "ALK Mutation (Gene Rearrangement)." 

American Cancer Society: “Cancer Facts & Figures 2015.”

American Cancer Society: “Lung Cancer (Non-Small Cell).”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on June 06, 2018

SOURCES:

Roswell Park Cancer Institute: "Targeting Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Gene in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer."

My Cancer Genome: "ALK in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)."

Genetics Home Reference: "ALK."

Lung Cancer Foundation of America: "What Targeted Therapies Are Currently Available?"

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: "Genomic Testing."

UpToDate: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion oncogene positive non-small cell lung cancer.”

American Cancer Society: "Treatment choices by stage for non-small cell lung cancer."

American Cancer Society: "Targeted therapies for non-small cell lung cancer."

Bang, Y.J. October 2012. Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine,

Korpanty, G.J. , 2014. Frontiers in Oncology

UpToDate: “Patient information: Non-small cell lung cancer treatment; stage IV cancer (Beyond the Basics)."

Lab Tests Online. "ALK Mutation (Gene Rearrangement)." 

American Cancer Society: “Cancer Facts & Figures 2015.”

American Cancer Society: “Lung Cancer (Non-Small Cell).”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on June 06, 2018

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Can a clinical trial help treat non-small-cell lung cancer?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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