PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What are common side effects of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT)?

ANSWER

The most common side effects of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) are:

  • Feeling tired
  • Redness, like sunburn, at the radiation site
  • Itchiness at the radiation site
  • Swelling at or near the radiation site
  • Nausea or vomiting if the tumor is near your bowel or liver

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "How Radiation Therapy Can Affect Different Parts of the Body."

Cancer.Net: "What to expect when you're having radiation," "Proton therapy."

Mayo Clinic: "Stereotactic radiosurgery."

MedlinePlus: "Adrenal Gland Disorders."

MD Anderson Cancer Center: "Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT)."

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: "What is SBRT?"

National Cancer Institute: "Radiation Therapy to Treat Cancer," "SEER Training/Types of Radiation Therapy."

RadiologyInfo.org: "Fiducial Marker Placement."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on November 20, 2019

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "How Radiation Therapy Can Affect Different Parts of the Body."

Cancer.Net: "What to expect when you're having radiation," "Proton therapy."

Mayo Clinic: "Stereotactic radiosurgery."

MedlinePlus: "Adrenal Gland Disorders."

MD Anderson Cancer Center: "Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT)."

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: "What is SBRT?"

National Cancer Institute: "Radiation Therapy to Treat Cancer," "SEER Training/Types of Radiation Therapy."

RadiologyInfo.org: "Fiducial Marker Placement."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on November 20, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

What kinds of cancer get treated by stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT)?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: