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What are reasons besides smoking that I should get screened for lung cancer?

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Besides smoking, there are other reasons you could have higher odds of developing lung cancer. Your doctor may suggest you get screened if you:

  • Spent a lot of time around chemicals such as radon, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, nickel, silica, or asbestos
  • Already had small-cell lung cancer, or cancer of the head or neck
  • Had radiation therapy to the chest to treat cancer
  • Had a parent, brother or sister, or child with lung cancer
  • Have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or pulmonary fibrosis (scarring in the lungs)

From: Lung Cancer Screening and Tests WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Exams and tests that look for lung cancer." "Tests for small cell lung cancer."

American Society of Clinical Oncology: "Lung Cancer - Non-Small Cell: Diagnosis."

CDC: "Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines and Recommendations." "What are the Risk Factors for Lung Cancer?" "What Screening Tests are There?"

National Comprehensive Cancer Network: "Lung Cancer Screening."

National Institute for Health and Care Excellence: "Lung cancer: diagnosis and management."

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force: "Screening for Lung Cancer: Consumer Guide."

University of Kansas Cancer Center: "Frequently Asked Questions About Lung Cancer Screening with Low-Dose CT."

UptoDate: "Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration in the mediastinum."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on July 11, 2018

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Exams and tests that look for lung cancer." "Tests for small cell lung cancer."

American Society of Clinical Oncology: "Lung Cancer - Non-Small Cell: Diagnosis."

CDC: "Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines and Recommendations." "What are the Risk Factors for Lung Cancer?" "What Screening Tests are There?"

National Comprehensive Cancer Network: "Lung Cancer Screening."

National Institute for Health and Care Excellence: "Lung cancer: diagnosis and management."

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force: "Screening for Lung Cancer: Consumer Guide."

University of Kansas Cancer Center: "Frequently Asked Questions About Lung Cancer Screening with Low-Dose CT."

UptoDate: "Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration in the mediastinum."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on July 11, 2018

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How does a screening test for lung cancer work?

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