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What can I do to prevent lung cancer?

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Although you can’t prevent every case, you can take steps to reduce your risk:

1. If you smoke, make it your top priority to quit. It’s hard to do -- and it often takes several tries before you kick the habit for good. The problem is nicotine is highly addictive. Still, thousands of people do quit successfully, making lung cancer less likely. You can talk to your doctor about the most effective ways to quit.

2. Avoid beta-carotene supplements. Studies show that it can make lung cancer more likely in people who smoke.

3. Check your home for radon. Most hardware stores carry an inexpensive and easy-to-use kit that accurately measures radon levels.

4. Exercise and eat a diet rich in fruits and vegetables . These healthy habits will lower your risk of several forms of cancer, as well as for heart disease and diabetes.

From: Can You Prevent Lung Cancer? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Cancer Institute.

American Cancer Society.

American Lung Association.

OncoLink.

Lung Cancer Alliance.

National Institutes of Health: "NIH State-of-the-Science Conference Statement on Multivitamin/Mineral Supplements and Chronic Disease Prevention."

Environmental Protection Agency .

Bach, P. , March 7, 2007. Journal of the American Medical Association

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on November 12, 2018

SOURCES:

National Cancer Institute.

American Cancer Society.

American Lung Association.

OncoLink.

Lung Cancer Alliance.

National Institutes of Health: "NIH State-of-the-Science Conference Statement on Multivitamin/Mineral Supplements and Chronic Disease Prevention."

Environmental Protection Agency .

Bach, P. , March 7, 2007. Journal of the American Medical Association

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on November 12, 2018

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How are clinical trials used to treat lung cancer?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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