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What causes lung cancer in nonsmokers?

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In nonsmokers, the No. 1 cause of lung cancer is radon gas. Radon is a gas in the soil in some areas. It can seep into homes and get into the air. You can't smell radon gas. The only way to know your home has it is to test for it.

Asbestos, diesel exhaust, and certain heavy metals are also linked to lung cancer. If you work around these substances, ask your employer for ways to protect yourself. And of course, avoid other people's tobacco smoke. Secondhand smoke is a risk.

From: Is Lung Cancer Genetic? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Lung Cancer Risks for Non-Smokers," "What Causes Lung Cancer?"

American Lung Association: "What Causes Lung Cancer."

Annals of Oncology : "Fruits, vegetables and lung cancer risk: A systematic review and meta-analysis."

Genetics Home Reference: "Lung Cancer."

Oncology Letters : "Familial Risk for Lung Cancer."

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: "Lung Cancer Genomic Testing (EGFR, KRAS, ALK)."

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force: "Lung Cancer: Screening."

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on October 17, 2019

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Lung Cancer Risks for Non-Smokers," "What Causes Lung Cancer?"

American Lung Association: "What Causes Lung Cancer."

Annals of Oncology : "Fruits, vegetables and lung cancer risk: A systematic review and meta-analysis."

Genetics Home Reference: "Lung Cancer."

Oncology Letters : "Familial Risk for Lung Cancer."

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: "Lung Cancer Genomic Testing (EGFR, KRAS, ALK)."

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force: "Lung Cancer: Screening."

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on October 17, 2019

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