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What drugs has been shown to treat lung cancer?

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Drugs that target a growth factor receptor (EGFR), such as afatinib (Gilotrif), erlotinib (Tarceva), necitumumab (Portrazza) and osimertinibi (Tagrisso), as well as the tumor blood supply blockers bevacizumab (Avastin) and ramucirumab (Cyramza), have shown significant activity in helping to control advanced lung cancer. Gefitinib (Iressa) has been approved as a first-line treatment of patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and offers another targeted therapy for tumors with specific EGFR mutations.

Nivolumab (Opdivo) and pembrolizumab (Keytruda) are immunotherapy drugs that block the protein that keeps the body from fighting cancer. It has been found to be effective in treating metastatic squamous cell NSCLC that has continued to progress after platinum-based chemotherapy.

The drugs alectinib (Alecensa), certinib (Zykadia) and crizotinib (Xalkori) have been found to attack a certain molecule seen in some lung cancers. Several of these drugs are also used for tumors that have ROS1 gene changes.

Dabrafenib (Tafinlar) and Trametinib (Mekinist) target certain proteins in tumors that have changes in the BRAF gene.

You'll be tested to determine if these drugs can effectively fight your specific type of lung cancer.

SOURCES: 

National Cancer Institute. 

National Institutes of Health. 

WebMD Medical Reference from the American College of Physicians: “Section 12 VIII Lung Cancer.”

News release, FDA.

American Cancer Society.

American Lung Association. 

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on February 05, 2019

SOURCES: 

National Cancer Institute. 

National Institutes of Health. 

WebMD Medical Reference from the American College of Physicians: “Section 12 VIII Lung Cancer.”

News release, FDA.

American Cancer Society.

American Lung Association. 

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on February 05, 2019

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