PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What drugs help your immune system to treat small-cell lung cancer (SCLC)?

ANSWER

Immune checkpoint inhibitors: Some immune cells have proteins that act as off switches. These “checkpoints” prevent them from killing cancer cells. Immune checkpoint inhibitors target these proteins and allow immune cells to attack the cancer. These types of drugs are the most promising for SCLC.

Monoclonal antibodies: These man-made immune system proteins can attack certain parts of cancer cells. They’re also used as checkpoint inhibitors.

Cancer vaccines: These substances kick-start an immune system response. They can prevent or treat certain cancers. Scientists are beginning to study vaccines for SCLC.

SOURCES:

The Oncologist: “The Future of Immunotherapy in the Treatment of Small Cell Lung Cancer.”

American Cancer Society: “Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment,” “What Is Immunotherapy?”

Meaghan L. Khan, MD, oncologist, Baylor Scott & White Healthcare.

Antonio Giordano, MD, PhD, director, Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine and Center of Biotechnology, College of Science and Technology, Temple University; professor of pathology, University of Sienna, Italy.

Scott Antonia, MD, PhD, chair, department of thoracic oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL; professor, oncologic Sciences, University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, FL.

NIH: “FAQ: ClinicalTrials.gov - Clinical Trial Phases.”

National Comprehensive Cancer Network: “About NCCN.”

Merck: “Frequently Asked Questions about pembrolizumab Expanded Access Program.”

Clinical Trials.gov: “SC16LD6.5 in Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer.”

OncoMed Pharmaceuticals: “Development Pipeline.”

Clinical Cancer Research: “Targeting Notch Signaling with a Notch2/Notch3 Antagonist (Tarextumab) Inhibits Tumor Growth and Decreases Tumor-Initiating Cell Frequency.”

Abstract presented at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting: “Safety and efficacy of single-agent rovalpituzumab tesirine (SC16LD6.5), a delta-like protein 3 (DLL3)-targeted antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) in recurrent or refractory small cell lung cancer (SCLC).”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on August 22, 2019

SOURCES:

The Oncologist: “The Future of Immunotherapy in the Treatment of Small Cell Lung Cancer.”

American Cancer Society: “Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment,” “What Is Immunotherapy?”

Meaghan L. Khan, MD, oncologist, Baylor Scott & White Healthcare.

Antonio Giordano, MD, PhD, director, Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine and Center of Biotechnology, College of Science and Technology, Temple University; professor of pathology, University of Sienna, Italy.

Scott Antonia, MD, PhD, chair, department of thoracic oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL; professor, oncologic Sciences, University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, FL.

NIH: “FAQ: ClinicalTrials.gov - Clinical Trial Phases.”

National Comprehensive Cancer Network: “About NCCN.”

Merck: “Frequently Asked Questions about pembrolizumab Expanded Access Program.”

Clinical Trials.gov: “SC16LD6.5 in Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer.”

OncoMed Pharmaceuticals: “Development Pipeline.”

Clinical Cancer Research: “Targeting Notch Signaling with a Notch2/Notch3 Antagonist (Tarextumab) Inhibits Tumor Growth and Decreases Tumor-Initiating Cell Frequency.”

Abstract presented at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting: “Safety and efficacy of single-agent rovalpituzumab tesirine (SC16LD6.5), a delta-like protein 3 (DLL3)-targeted antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) in recurrent or refractory small cell lung cancer (SCLC).”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on August 22, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

Which drugs treat small-cell lung cancer (SCLC)

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: