PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

Who shouldn't get immunotherapy?

ANSWER

If you have an autoimmune disease -- like lupus, thyroiditis, Crohn’s disease, or rheumatoid arthritis -- immunotherapy may not be safe for you. Your doctor will also want to make sure any active or chronic infections are under control before starting this type of treatment.

From: Is Immunotherapy Right for me? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Lungcancer.org: “Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment.”

Cancer Research Institute: “Lung Cancer,” “Should You Participate?”

Cancer.net: “9 Things to Know About Immunotherapy and Lung Cancer,” “Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Testing for Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.”

American Lung Association: “What You Need to Know About Lung Cancer Immunotherapy.”

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: Combination Immunotherapy Shows New Promise for Lung Cancer,” “Why a New Immunotherapy for Lung Cancer Works for Only Some People.”

Keytruda.

National Cancer Institute: “More Immunotherapy Options Approved for Lung Cancer.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on December 26, 2016

SOURCES:

Lungcancer.org: “Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment.”

Cancer Research Institute: “Lung Cancer,” “Should You Participate?”

Cancer.net: “9 Things to Know About Immunotherapy and Lung Cancer,” “Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Testing for Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.”

American Lung Association: “What You Need to Know About Lung Cancer Immunotherapy.”

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: Combination Immunotherapy Shows New Promise for Lung Cancer,” “Why a New Immunotherapy for Lung Cancer Works for Only Some People.”

Keytruda.

National Cancer Institute: “More Immunotherapy Options Approved for Lung Cancer.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on December 26, 2016

NEXT QUESTION:

What is immunotherapy?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: