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Why would you need a lobectomy?

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It’s usually the main treatment for people with the early stages of lung cancer, when there’s a tumor in just one part of the lung. In that case, a lobectomy offers the best chance for a cure and may be the only treatment you need. But it doesn't help when cancer has spread to your whole lung or to other parts of your body. The surgery may also help people who have other diseases in one part of their lungs, like:

When you have the damaged lobe removed, other parts of your lungs expand, making it easier to breathe.

  • Tuberculosis
  • Emphysema
  • Tumors that aren’t cancer
  • Fungal infections
  • Pus that fills one area, called an abscess

From: What Is a Lobectomy? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Surgery for small-cell lung cancer." "Treatment for non-small cell lung cancer, by stage."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Lobectomy."

Cleveland Clinic: "Lobectomy of Lung-Minimally Invasive Approach to Lung Cancer Surgery" (video).

UptoDate: "Management of stage I and stage II non-small cell lung cancer."

American Lung Association: "COPD: Surgery."

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: "Why Consider Robotic Surgery for Lung, Esophageal and Other Chest Cancers?"

American Thoracic Society: "Pulmonary Rehabilitation."

Glattki, GP. 2012. American Journal of Clinical Oncology,

Veterans Health Library: "Surgery for Lung Problems."

University of Michigan Health System: "After Your Lung Surgery."

Reviewed by William Blahd on April 07, 2016

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Surgery for small-cell lung cancer." "Treatment for non-small cell lung cancer, by stage."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Lobectomy."

Cleveland Clinic: "Lobectomy of Lung-Minimally Invasive Approach to Lung Cancer Surgery" (video).

UptoDate: "Management of stage I and stage II non-small cell lung cancer."

American Lung Association: "COPD: Surgery."

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: "Why Consider Robotic Surgery for Lung, Esophageal and Other Chest Cancers?"

American Thoracic Society: "Pulmonary Rehabilitation."

Glattki, GP. 2012. American Journal of Clinical Oncology,

Veterans Health Library: "Surgery for Lung Problems."

University of Michigan Health System: "After Your Lung Surgery."

Reviewed by William Blahd on April 07, 2016

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What are the risks of a lobectomy?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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