PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

Is an inhaler or nebulizer better to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)?

ANSWER

It depends on what your doctor recommends, your personal preference, and what your insurance will cover. The key is to make sure you feel comfortable with -- and correctly use -- whichever one you choose.

Most people with COPD use an inhaler. One big advantage is that they're portable. While you have to use a nebulizer at home (or in a medical facility), you can carry an inhaler in your pocket. Inhalers also deliver medication more quickly. After a few puffs, perhaps taken 1-2 minutes, you're done.

If you have trouble with inhalers, nebulizers might be the best choice for you. They also can help temporarily if you have a COPD flare-up. Some people just prefer nebulizers and feel they're more effective. You and your doctor can talk about which one is best for you.

From: What Devices Help Treat COPD? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Norman Edelman, MD, chief medical officer, American Lung Association.

Gail Weinmann, MD, deputy director, NHLBI’s Division of Lung Diseases, Washington D.C.

American Association for Respiratory Care.

American Lung Association.

Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease.

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

National Jewish Health.

National Lung Health Education Program.

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 25, 2017

SOURCES:

Norman Edelman, MD, chief medical officer, American Lung Association.

Gail Weinmann, MD, deputy director, NHLBI’s Division of Lung Diseases, Washington D.C.

American Association for Respiratory Care.

American Lung Association.

Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease.

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

National Jewish Health.

National Lung Health Education Program.

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 25, 2017

NEXT QUESTION:

What are 5 tips for using inhaled chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) medicine?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: