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What breathing exercises help COPD?

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There are two key breathing exercises:

Pursed-lips breathing: Breathe in through your nose for 2 seconds. Pucker your lips. Blow air through your mouth for about 5 seconds. This slows your breathing, keeps your airways open, and helps boost oxygen.

Abdominal (diaphragmatic) breathing: Relax your shoulders. Put one hand on your heart and the other on your stomach. Inhale through your nose, making sure your stomach expands. Slowly breathe out through pursed lips, pressing on your belly.

From: Everyday Tips for Living With COPD WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Paul Boyce on February 06, 2019

Medically Reviewed on 02/06/2019

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “COPD.”

American Lung Association: “Learn About COPD.”

National Health Service (U.K.), “Living With COPD.”

COPD Foundation: “Breathing Techniques.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Diseases & Conditions: COPD Exercise & Activity Guidelines,” “Diseases & Conditions: Nutritional Guidelines for People with COPD.”

Beaumont Health: “7 Tips for Safer Sex with COPD.”

Reviewed by Paul Boyce on February 06, 2019

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “COPD.”

American Lung Association: “Learn About COPD.”

National Health Service (U.K.), “Living With COPD.”

COPD Foundation: “Breathing Techniques.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Diseases & Conditions: COPD Exercise & Activity Guidelines,” “Diseases & Conditions: Nutritional Guidelines for People with COPD.”

Beaumont Health: “7 Tips for Safer Sex with COPD.”

Reviewed by Paul Boyce on February 06, 2019

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