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What kind of air purifier should I buy if I have COPD?

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Air purifiers with HEPA filters that have a MERV (minimum efficiency reporting value) rating of 11-13 are a good choice. The higher the number, the better. They clean more than 99% of the fine particles from your room's air.

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Can Air Purifiers Improve Your Lung and Heart Health?”

American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology: “Air Filters.”

Brigham and Women’s Hospital: “Air Filters, Dehumidifiers, and Humidifiers.”

Environmental Protection Agency: “Indoor Air Quality: Air Cleaners and Air Filters in the Home.”

American Journal of Respiratory Critical Care Medicine: “Indoor air quality in homes of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.”

American Journal of Epidemiology: “The effect of ozone and PM10 on hospital admissions for pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a national multicity study.”

Current Opinions in Pulmonary Medicine: “Pulmonary Health Effects of Air Pollution.”

Environmental Health: “Portable air cleaners should be at the forefront of the public health response to landscape fire smoke.”

Intermountain Health Care: “Do Indoor Air Filters Really Help You Breathe Easier?”

Clinical and Experimental Allergy: “Clinical effects of air filters in homes of asthmatic adults sensitized and exposed to pet allergens.”

Journal of the American College of Cardiology: “Cardiopulmonary Benefits of Reducing Indoor Particles of Outdoor Origin.”

The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: “Air filters and air cleaners: Rostrum by the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Indoor Allergen Committee.”

Consumer Reports: “Don’t Spend Money on an Air Purifier You May Not Need.”

Environmental Working Group: “Air filters.”

Johnson Memorial Health: “COPD Triggers and How to Avoid Them.”

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on July 30, 2019

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Can Air Purifiers Improve Your Lung and Heart Health?”

American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology: “Air Filters.”

Brigham and Women’s Hospital: “Air Filters, Dehumidifiers, and Humidifiers.”

Environmental Protection Agency: “Indoor Air Quality: Air Cleaners and Air Filters in the Home.”

American Journal of Respiratory Critical Care Medicine: “Indoor air quality in homes of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.”

American Journal of Epidemiology: “The effect of ozone and PM10 on hospital admissions for pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a national multicity study.”

Current Opinions in Pulmonary Medicine: “Pulmonary Health Effects of Air Pollution.”

Environmental Health: “Portable air cleaners should be at the forefront of the public health response to landscape fire smoke.”

Intermountain Health Care: “Do Indoor Air Filters Really Help You Breathe Easier?”

Clinical and Experimental Allergy: “Clinical effects of air filters in homes of asthmatic adults sensitized and exposed to pet allergens.”

Journal of the American College of Cardiology: “Cardiopulmonary Benefits of Reducing Indoor Particles of Outdoor Origin.”

The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: “Air filters and air cleaners: Rostrum by the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Indoor Allergen Committee.”

Consumer Reports: “Don’t Spend Money on an Air Purifier You May Not Need.”

Environmental Working Group: “Air filters.”

Johnson Memorial Health: “COPD Triggers and How to Avoid Them.”

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on July 30, 2019

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Should I get an air ionizer to clean the air in my home if I have COPD?

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