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How do you get a diagnosis of pneumoconiosis?

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Your doctor may use X-rays or CT scans to figure out if you have pneumoconiosis. If you have the disease, images from these tests will show scar tissue in your lungs or dense lumps of tissue called nodules. Your doctor may order other tests to better understand your condition. You may get a pulmonary function test to see how well air enters and leaves your lungs. An oxygen saturation test shows how much of the oxygen you breathe makes it to your bloodstream.

SOURCES:

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Pneumoconiosis."

Environmental Health Perspectives : "Silicosis and coal workers' pneumoconiosis."

CHEST Foundation: "Pneumoconiosis."

American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine: "Occupational Interstitial Lung Diseases."

CDC: "Resurgence of Progressive Massive Fibrosis in Coal Miners -- Eastern Kentucky, 2016."

American Lung Association: "Oxygen Therapy."

Reviewed by Paul Boyce on December 18, 2019

SOURCES:

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Pneumoconiosis."

Environmental Health Perspectives : "Silicosis and coal workers' pneumoconiosis."

CHEST Foundation: "Pneumoconiosis."

American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine: "Occupational Interstitial Lung Diseases."

CDC: "Resurgence of Progressive Massive Fibrosis in Coal Miners -- Eastern Kentucky, 2016."

American Lung Association: "Oxygen Therapy."

Reviewed by Paul Boyce on December 18, 2019

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Which treatments can help manage the symptoms of pneumoconiosis?

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