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How does chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affect your breathing?

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Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may make you feel like your chest is so tight you can’t breathe. Like asthma, it can make you wheeze, too. You may cough and bring up sticky, slimy mucus. There is no cure for COPD, but there are ways to feel better. For example, your doctor may want you to use an inhaler, do breathing exercises, and learn techniques to help you breathe more easily.

SOURCES:

Merck Manual Consumer Version: “Shortness of Breath.”

NIH National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “What Is Asthma?”

American Thoracic Society Patient Information Series: “Breathlessness.”

National Institute on Aging, Age Page: “Understanding Lung Problems—Make Each Breath Count.”

Mayo Clinic: “Pulmonary Embolism.”

Mayo Clinic: “Interstitial Lung Disease.”

Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation: “About PF.”

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on August 12, 2018

SOURCES:

Merck Manual Consumer Version: “Shortness of Breath.”

NIH National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “What Is Asthma?”

American Thoracic Society Patient Information Series: “Breathlessness.”

National Institute on Aging, Age Page: “Understanding Lung Problems—Make Each Breath Count.”

Mayo Clinic: “Pulmonary Embolism.”

Mayo Clinic: “Interstitial Lung Disease.”

Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation: “About PF.”

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on August 12, 2018

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How does chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affect your breathing?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.